#WhatTheHeckMan · African Stories · Fiction · Stories

Bastards 2

Blood is thicker than water but only one bleeds when the heart is cut.

In.
Out.
In.
Out.
In.
Wow.
I couldn’t see the light. Was I even supposed to see the light being that I died in sin?
Has anyone figured out how that whole thing works?
I obviously had not.
The room was dark and everything was moving slow.
I was trying to figure out what was going to happen next. Slowly opening my eyes trying to see what just happened…
As I opened my eyes I looked around my body to make sure that I had not been shot.
I couldn’t find any bullet wounds, so I looked over to where Adesuwa was standing.
Slammed to the floor with a gun in her hand.
I looked over to the door of the room and that is where I saw her standing with a gun in her hand. I was shocked. After all, she wasn’t supposed to be here till tomorrow. “How did you get here so fast?”, I thought.

“Ivie, what the fuck?
What are you doing here?”

I said as I got off the bed.
I slowly got up and walked over to her. As I approached, she lowered the weapon.
None of it made sense.
Shaking to my bones, I slowly approached Ivie.

“Ivie, let me explain.”

I opened with. I was trying to calm her down and not let her shoot me because I was cheating on her.
As I approached her, I knelt down and pleaded.

“Ivie, I am sorry.”

She didn’t even look at me. Her eyes were fixed on Adesuwa’s lifeless body on the ground.
A whole minute that felt like an eternity must have passed, but she eventually handed the gun to me.
I took it in my hand and stood up.
As I backed away from her, she said,

“We need to get rid of the body.”

My eyes grew big and I couldn’t understand why.
I asked.

“Why?”

It was as if then she finally snapped out of a trance and she said,

“Your mistress is dead on your bedroom floor and you’re asking me why?”

“But I didn’t shoot her.”

I replied.
Cold and firm, she walked over to me and said,

“Your prints are all over that gun in your hand, your semen is probably inside of her and your soon to be wife was about to walk in on you two, what do you think they would believe Tomiwa?”

I stared at the gun in my hand and then at Adesuwa’s body.
Fuck!
She was right.

She helped me put the body in the carpet from the living room on the second floor; we hauled the body down and outside the house.
As I lifted the body into my trunk, she asked me,

“Are you going to dump it in the water?”

I shook my head and said,

“No, the body could float. I have to find an incinerator or dump it on the way to Lagos.”

She didn’t argue.
I ran back into the house and got all of her things. I vividly remember putting her cellphone in my pocket.
As I got into the car, I asked Ivie,

“Are you coming with me?”

She sharply said

“No.”

Then she continued and said,

“I have to drive my car to Lagos. Obviously cannot leave it here.
I’ll meet you at the house in Lagos”

————

The drive to Lagos felt like the longest in my life.
I kept trying to drive fast but I was worried that if I drove too fast it would raise suspicion.

Mowe-Ibafo, Berger, and I was making my way to Oshodi.
Sweating profusely, my throat was dry. I was just trying to get to the incinerator at my friend’s waste management company.
It was already midday as I pulled into the parking lot, I hadn’t called him ahead of time.
How would I have explained needing a professional torching chamber?

As I parked, one of the employees came up to me just as I was stepping out of the car.
She curtsied as she came closer.

“Good afternoon sir.”

She said.

“Good afternoon, is your oga around?”

I asked her in response.

“No sir.”

She replied with some disappointment.

“Will he be in today?”

I asked. She shook her her head and said,

“I don’t think so sir. Today and tomorrow, we are doing maintenance around the whole facility. So I don’t think anybody from the office side will be here. Till Thursday sir.

Do you need me to call him sir?”

I raised my hand to discourage her against that.

“No need my dear.”

I got back into the car and started it as I tried to drive off. I was turned around, trying to back out of the parking spot when I heard a light tap on the window.
I turned back to my left and she was standing there. As I wound down, she said,

“Oga, it’s like blood is dripping on the floor from your boot (trunk).”

I smiled and said,

“Oh, don’t worry about it, mo se se tan lodo awon eleran ni.”
“Don’t worry about it, I just left the meat sellers/meat packing.”

“Oh okay, sir.
Ke ni nice day”
“Have a nice day.”

As I drove out of the facility, I started to panic.
The body in the trunk was dripping and it was the high of the afternoon.
That meant I had to keep the body in there till night came before disposing of it.
Fuck.

As I pulled up to my house, I was trying to get in and park the car without anyone noticing me.
Audu, my gateman, opened up the gate and I immediately sent him on an errand that required him to leave the house.
Nkechi, the maid, was more than likely inside, preparing dinner. I quickly parked the car and I was walking to the gate when I heard sirens and the police swarmed my compound.
Immediately, I was reprimanded, handcuffed and thrown in the back of a police car.

The head arresting officer marched into the compound, walked to my car, stopped and then walked back to the car I was in .
He opened the door and said,

“Where are the car keys?”

“In my pocket.”

I replied.
He reached into my pocket and pulled it out.

“Take him to the station.”

He said as he closed the door.
And within seconds, the car was leaving.
All I could think of was WhatTheHeckMan.


Sanmi here popping in to say hi! If you’re new to WhatTheHeckMan, welcome!
I am not sorry for the cliffhangers and the suspense but I am thrilled to have you here. I hope you enjoy my stories – most of which I create in my head. My #WordsOfWednesday pieces are unfiltered and the purest me.
Thank you for reading all of it.
Please, if you are reading this, let me know how you feel about the story. Don’t assume that I don’t see it or that other people are doing it, so you don’t need to. Your support is EVERYTHING.


Here are my last three posts. Enjoy!
How are you doing, Sanmi?
Bastards
Too Faithful to Fail Me

Missed the last series? Start here! Scar Tissue
Now back to Bastards 2! Brace yourself. 😎


Sitting in that dark and cold cell, I kept thinking about how I got there.
How did they know the body was in the car?
I had only left Ibadan a few hours before. Did the girl from my friend’s business call him and he called the police?
How did the police know where to go immediately?
No fuss, no “detective” work, they just knew.

For the longest time, it never even crossed my mind that the person that helped me put the body in the trunk, may have snitched on me.
It felt like an eternity sitting there trying to piece together what had happened.
It had been an incredible 36 hours.
No one ever thinks that you would find out that your beloved father was not your father, your childhood love would die in front of you and you would be arrested for murder, all before another moon.

There was a man wailing in the cell next to me.
I could tell that he had been beaten and he was crying out for his family – essentially saying that he didn’t do whatever he was arrested for and he couldn’t breathe in that tight cell.
I was thinking about what I would say.
What would happen officially?
Would people at the company start looking at my siblings and I differently?
A wedding was in the works, but I was about to be outed as a cheat. And what would Ivie think of me?
What was she thinking of me?
Did she make it to Lagos safely? Did she know that I was taken?
Did she know I was taken by the police and not robbed or kidnapped?

I wasn’t sure what time it was but I was starting to get sleepy.
It was a weird feeling because my heart was racing like crazy but my body was tired.
I started crying.
As quietly as possible, all of the tears and sobs I tried to contain in the dark cell started to seep out.
My asthma was starting to act up and I was begging my body to behave but my heart was shattering.
It felt like my chest was closing in on my heart.
I stopped crying and began trying to control my breaths.
Slowly, in and out.
In.
Out.
In.
Out.
I closed my eyes and tried to wiggle my toes –
a grounding technique I learned back in college. As I was starting to calm down, an officer came to the cell door and shook the bars while saying,

“Tomiwa Fehintola”

I opened my eyes and sprung up.

“Yes, that’s me.”

“Your people dey here to see you.”

He said.

“My people?”

I asked to clarify.

“You no hear wetin I just talk?”

He replied rudely as he opened up the cell door.
I quickly rose and headed out of the cell. The hallway was dark and tight but I just followed him towards the end of the hallway.

As I came into the waiting area, I noticed my mother, our family lawyer and the DPO (Divisional Police Officer)
They appeared to have been in conversation before I appeared.
As soon as my mother saw me, you could see the relief on her face.

“Oko mi, are you alright?”

She asked concernedly while throwing her arms around me.
I nodded while fighting back those tears I was just shedding.
I knew I would leave there deep down, but with Nigerian police, what can you really trust or guarantee?

My mother and I walked out of the police station and towards the car as she rubbed my back.
We got into the car and waited as the lawyer spoke to the police.
I sat behind the driver and my mother sat next to me.
She asked again,

“Are you okay?”

I nodded again and said,

“Yes ma.”

A few seconds after, the lawyer got into the passenger seat.
The driver started the car and we drove out of the station.
As we got onto the main road, the lawyer turned around and said,

“Tomiwa, I have to ask you a few questions.
I know the last few hours have been hard but I need to know so we can start working.”

I nodded.

“Did you shoot that young woman?”

He asked.
I shook my head and said,

“No.”

He continued,

“Did you have any intentions of killing her or having her killed?”

I shook my head again and said,

“Absolutely not. I loved her.”

My mother looked at me when those words left my mouth.
She knew I did.
Everyone knew I did.
But it was not what my father wanted, so it never happened. It appeared that having his own children was the only thing my father didn’t have his own way.

The lawyer asked next,

“Do you have the gun or know where it is?”

I replied,

“Yes, I do. It’s in the locked glove compartment of my car.”

“Good. Good.”

He replied.

My mother said,

“We are going to stop by my house first before we take you to yours.”

I wasn’t sure why but I replied.

“Okay.”

A few seconds of silence and then I thought to ask,

“How did you even know where I was?”

“Tobe came back and noticed the gate was open and your car abandoned. He watched the CCTV recording and contacted me. I called around and located where you were being held.
Mr. Williams and I drove down from Ibadan to get you.”

She explained.
That damn CCTV finally came to use. And then it clicked.
I had the same system installed in my Ibadan home. Hell, my father had us install security systems everywhere.
That meant I could prove that Ivie came in when she did and murdered Adesuwa.

In a weird sequence of events, I felt quick relief and then sadness at realizing that Adesuwa was still gone.
I asked my mother,

“Where is her body?”

“Don’t worry about that son. Her family has been notified and we have explained that more details will follow as the investigation develops. Like I said, it’s being handled.”

She replied with calm and confidence. I had only ever seen my mother like this once in my life – when my father had knee surgery and she had to run the business for a few months.
She didn’t always flex this side of her but I always knew there was a cold blooded schemer in her. I knew there was more command, especially with the news about my father not being my father.
But I was willing to wait to learn those truths.

“Tomiwa, I am sorry about Adesuwa. I am well aware that you loved her and wished you could marry her but as you will continue to find out, in life, we do not always get what we want or deserve.
You will have your time to mourn her loss, but for now, I need you to be strong because we are about to be at war.”

She trailed on and I interrupted,

“War?”

She looked at me and echoed,

“War.
Yes, a full blown war against some bastards trying to ruin us. So brace yourself.
You and your sisters need to be at full attention and stay vigilant.”

She paused and said,

“Does Ivie know about Adesuwa?”

I nodded.
She sighed and said,

“Hmmm. How is she handling that with the baby?”

She tilted her head to the left as she looked at me.

“Baby?
What baby?”

My mom pulled down her glasses.

“You weren’t planning on telling me that Ivie was pregnant?”

She asked almost in betrayal.

“Pregnant?!”

I was shocked.

“Ivie and I have never had sex. Never.”

I explained to her.

“You and Ivie have never been intimate?
In all these yearsssss???”

She exclaimed.

“Yes mother. She always told me that she was waiting for marriage.
And I agreed because frankly I didn’t love her anyways so having sex with her was not something that I particularly wanted.”

My mom stared straight ahead with her right hand on her chin and muttered,

“You didn’t know?”

I then asked.

“How did you know?”

She said.

“Ivie came by the house early this morning in Ibadan and told me herself. I was wondering where you were but she said you rushed to Lagos.
It made no sense to me but I just assumed she was eager to share with me as she missed the funeral and all.
You know…to give me good news in these dark times.”

I laughed and said.

“Ivie came to you this morning?”

She nodded.

“In Ibadan?”

I continued.
She replied,

“Yes.”

I laughed and shook my head before planting them in my hands.
My head was spinning.
I was out of my depth and completely confused.
This woman was cheating on me as I was cheating on her but why would she try to pass off the child as mine?

My mother asked,

“So if the child is not yours and you didn’t know, then who is the father?”

Mr Williams in the front of the car responded without looking back,

“It’s his brother’s.”

I raised my head out of my hands as my mother and I screamed,

“What?!”

End of Part 2. I know you want part 3 ASAP but to get it, you have to comment! Go ahead and drop it below!
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© 2020 #WhatTheHeckMan

11 thoughts on “Bastards 2

  1. Whattttttttt!!! How many times will one story make me scream!! I knew Ivie was up to something, when she handed him the gun. She really set him up perfectly. Fear people oooo!! I wish this was a book, so I can read it in one go and not wait weekly 😩😩.. master of cliffhangers for true

    Like

    1. Hahahaha I am so grateful for you and everyone that comes back to read. The cliffhangers are the thrill and they keep even you going. You secretly love it. Thanks for commenting!

      Like

  2. Yea leave us in suspense as usual, BY THE WAY WTF which brother? My head is spinning , this part 2 is too short 😩😩😩

    Like

  3. Okayyyyyyyy, none of this makes any bloody sense anymore!? Like none!
    There’s been a murder, potential war on the way, jail/incarceration maybe, and to top it, a brother has just impregnated his own brother’s fiancée?!?? This is sooo sick! How bad can it get again at this point?!? Like how?!

    Ogun la’ye yii ooo!😳🤷🏾‍♀️

    Like

  4. Please come back here o. This cannot be the end of part 2. What am I supposed to do with myself while I wait for part 3? What the heck is going on?!

    Like

  5. Rahhhhh nahhh😩 wait oh why did Adesuwa pull a gun on him in the first place? Ivie ain’t shit not only did you kill my childhood sweetheart you cheated on me w/my brother AND got pregnant?? Also if you don’t love someone end it why would you stay and be unhappy?? Nahhhh I think his brother is behind all this madness. Honestly, 10/10 your work just keeps getting berra and berra!

    Like

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